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Epistle To The Son Of The Wolf By Baha U Lla H Read Ebook In IBOOKS, TXT, PRC


- Main body: A brief overview of the content, themes, and style of the Epistle to the Son of the Wolf - Conclusion: A summary of the main points and a recommendation for readers H2: Introduction - What is the Epistle to the Son of the Wolf? - Who is Baha'u'llah and what is his role in the Bahá'í Faith? - Who is Shaykh Muhammad-Taqiy-i-Najafi (the son of the wolf) and what is his relationship with Baha'u'llah? - What is the purpose and context of the Epistle to the Son of the Wolf? H2: Main body - What are the main topics and arguments that Baha'u'llah addresses in the Epistle to the Son of the Wolf? - How does Baha'u'llah use quotations from various religious scriptures and traditions to support his claims? - How does Baha'u'llah appeal to the son of the wolf's reason, conscience, and spiritual insight? - How does Baha'u'llah demonstrate his compassion, forgiveness, and generosity towards the son of the wolf and his enemies? - How does Baha'u'llah express his vision of a peaceful and unified world under God's guidance? H2: Conclusion - What are the main takeaways from reading the Epistle to the Son of the Wolf? - How does the Epistle to the Son of the Wolf relate to contemporary issues and challenges? - Why should readers consider reading or studying the Epistle to the Son of the Wolf? # Article with HTML formatting Epistle to the Son of the Wolf by Baha'u'llah: A Summary and Review




If you are looking for a profound and inspiring book that explores some of the most essential questions of human existence, you might want to check out Epistle to the Son of the Wolf by Baha'u'llah. This book is one of the last major works of Baha'u'llah, the founder of the Bahá'í Faith, before his death in 1892. It is a letter written to a Muslim cleric, a violent opponent of the Bahá'ís who, along with his father (called by Baha'u'llah "the wolf"), also a Muslim cleric, had put to death a number of Bahá'ís. In this letter, Baha'u'llah addresses some of the most fundamental issues of religion, morality, justice, and spirituality, and invites the son of the wolf to recognize and embrace his divine message.




Epistle to the Son of the Wolf by Baha u lla h Read ebook in IBOOKS, TXT, PRC


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In this article, we will provide a brief overview of the content, themes, and style of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, and explain why it is a valuable and relevant book for readers today. We will also provide some information on how you can access this book in different formats, such as IBOOKS, TXT, and PRC.


Introduction




Before we dive into the main body of our article, let us first introduce some background information on the author, the recipient, and the context of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.


What is Epistle to the Son of the Wolf?




Epistle to the Son of the Wolf


is a letter written by Baha'u'llah around 1891 at the Mansion of Bahjí, where he spent the last years of his life in exile and imprisonment by the Ottoman Empire. The letter is addressed to Shaykh Muhammad-Taqiy-i-Najafi, a prominent Muslim cleric who was known for his hostility and persecution of the Bahá'ís in Iran. Baha'u'llah refers to him as "the son of the wolf" because his father, Shaykh Muhammad-Baqir, also a Muslim cleric, was called "the wolf" by Baha'u'llah for his role in instigating the execution of several Bahá'ís, including the Báb, the forerunner of Baha'u'llah.


The letter is divided into three parts: the first part consists of a series of quotations from various religious scriptures and traditions that Baha'u'llah uses to support his claim to be the manifestation of God for this age; the second part contains a number of arguments and proofs that Baha'u'llah presents to the son of the wolf to demonstrate the validity and truth of his message; and the third part consists of a number of exhortations and admonitions that Baha'u'llah addresses to the son of the wolf and his enemies, as well as a vision of a peaceful and unified world under God's guidance.


Who is Baha'u'llah and what is his role in the Bahá'í Faith?




Baha'u'llah (1817-1892) is the founder of the Bahá'í Faith, a global religion that teaches the oneness of God, the oneness of humanity, and the oneness of religion. Baha'u'llah, whose name means "the Glory of God" in Arabic, claimed to be the manifestation of God for this age, fulfilling the prophecies of previous religions and bringing a new revelation for the spiritual and social advancement of humanity. Baha'u'llah's teachings are recorded in hundreds of tablets and books that he revealed throughout his life, such as The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, The Hidden Words, The Seven Valleys, The Book of Certitude, and Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.


Baha'u'llah was born into a noble family in Tehran, Iran, in 1817. He was known for his wisdom, generosity, and piety from a young age. In 1844, he became a follower of the Báb, a young merchant who proclaimed to be the herald of a new manifestation of God. The Báb's message attracted thousands of followers, but also aroused fierce opposition from the religious and political authorities, who persecuted and killed many of his followers. In 1850, the Báb was publicly executed in Tabriz, Iran.


Baha'u'llah was one of the leading figures of the Bábí movement, and suffered imprisonment, torture, exile, and assassination attempts for his faith. He was banished from Iran to Baghdad, Iraq, in 1853, where he publicly declared his mission as the manifestation of God in 1863. He was then further exiled to Constantinople (now Istanbul), Turkey; Adrianople (now Edirne), Turkey; and finally Acre (now Akko), Israel; where he spent the last 24 years of his life in confinement. He passed away in 1892 at the Mansion of Bahjí, near Acre.


Baha'u'llah is regarded by Bahá'ís as the most recent in a line of divine messengers that includes Abraham, Moses, Zoroaster, Buddha, Krishna, Jesus Christ, Muhammad, and the Báb. Bahá'ís believe that Baha'u'llah's revelation is not final or exclusive, but rather part of an ongoing and progressive process of divine guidance for humanity.


Who is Shaykh Muhammad-Taqiy-i-Najafi (the son of the wolf) and what is his relationship with Baha'u'llah?




Shaykh Muhammad-Taqiy-i-Najafi (died 1914) was a Muslim cleric who belonged to the Shi'a branch of Islam. He was also known as Áqá Najafí or Hájí Mírzá Hasan-i-Adíb. He was born in Najaf, Iraq, where he studied Islamic jurisprudence and theology. He later moved to Isfahan, Iran, where he became a prominent religious leader and scholar. He was also involved in politics and had influence over the Qajar dynasty that ruled Iran at that time.


What is the purpose and context of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf?




The purpose of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is to convey Baha'u'llah's message of peace, unity, and justice to one of his most bitter adversaries, and to call him to repentance and recognition of his divine mission. Baha'u'llah writes this letter in response to a request from the son of the wolf, who had sent him a list of questions and objections regarding his teachings. Baha'u'llah also writes this letter as a testament to his followers and future generations, as he was aware that his earthly life was nearing its end.


The context of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is the turbulent and oppressive situation that the Bahá'ís faced in Iran and other parts of the Middle East in the late 19th century. The Bahá'ís were subjected to severe persecution, discrimination, and violence by the religious and political authorities, who viewed them as heretics and apostates from Islam. The son of the wolf was one of the instigators and perpetrators of this persecution, and was responsible for issuing fatwas (religious edicts) that condemned the Bahá'ís to death, confiscation of property, imprisonment, torture, and exile. He also incited mobs to attack and kill Bahá'ís, and personally participated in some of these attacks.


Main body




In this section, we will provide a brief summary of the main topics and arguments that Baha'u'llah addresses in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. We will also highlight some of the key quotations from various religious scriptures and traditions that Baha'u'llah uses to support his claims.


What are the main topics and arguments that Baha'u'llah addresses in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf?




Baha'u'llah addresses a wide range of topics and arguments in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, covering various aspects of religion, morality, justice, and spirituality. Some of these topics and arguments are:



  • The proofs and evidences for Baha'u'llah's claim to be the manifestation of God for this age, such as his fulfillment of prophecies from previous religions, his miraculous deeds and writings, his sufferings and tribulations for his cause, his influence and impact on humanity, and his testimony from God.



  • The refutation of the objections and accusations that the son of the wolf and other opponents raised against Baha'u'llah's teachings, such as his abrogation of some laws and ordinances of Islam, his revelation of new laws and ordinances for humanity, his interpretation of some verses and traditions from Islamic sources, his assertion of his station and authority over other religious leaders, and his establishment of a new covenant and succession for his followers.



  • The exposition of some fundamental principles and teachings of Baha'u'llah's revelation, such as the oneness and transcendence of God, the unity and diversity of his manifestations, the harmony and continuity of his religions, the nobility and equality of human beings, the development and education of human potentialities, the promotion and protection of human rights and dignity, the establishment and maintenance of justice and order in society, the advancement and integration of science and religion, the preservation and conservation of the environment, and the realization and expression of love and service to God and humanity.



  • The invitation and challenge to the son of the wolf and his enemies to repent and recognize Baha'u'llah's message, and to abandon their hostility and persecution of the Bahá'ís, and instead join them in building a peaceful and unified world under God's guidance.



How does Baha'u'llah use quotations from various religious scriptures and traditions to support his claims?




Baha'u'llah uses quotations from various religious scriptures and traditions to support his claims in several ways. Some of these ways are:



  • He cites prophecies from previous religions that foretell his advent and describe his attributes, such as Isaiah 9:6-7, Daniel 7:13-14, Revelation 11:15-19, Qur'an 33:40, and Hadith of the Twelve Imams.



  • He quotes verses and passages from previous scriptures that affirm the oneness and transcendence of God, the unity and diversity of his manifestations, the harmony and continuity of his religions, and the need for a new revelation in every age, such as Deuteronomy 6:4, John 10:30, John 14:26, Qur'an 2:136, Qur'an 4:164, and Qur'an 5:48.



  • He interprets and explains some verses and traditions from Islamic sources that have been misunderstood or misapplied by his opponents, such as Qur'an 3:7, Qur'an 33:40, Qur'an 48:28, Hadith of the Ghadir Khumm, and Hadith of the Thaqalayn.



  • He reveals new meanings and insights from previous scriptures that demonstrate the depth and breadth of his knowledge and wisdom, such as Genesis 1:1-3, Psalm 19:1-4, Matthew 5:17-18, Matthew 24:27-31, Qur'an 24:35, and Qur'an 41:53.



  • He appeals to the son of the wolf's reason, conscience, and spiritual insight by asking him to reflect on the quotations that he presents, and to compare them with his own beliefs and actions, such as Isaiah 1:18, Matthew 7:15-20, Matthew 23:13-36, Qur'an 2:256, Qur'an 6:151-153, and Qur'an 49:13.



How does Baha'u'llah appeal to the son of the wolf's reason, conscience, and spiritual insight?




Baha'u'llah appeals to the son of the wolf's reason, conscience, and spiritual insight in several ways. Some of these ways are:



  • He reminds him of the signs and evidences that God has manifested in his creation and in his revelation, and asks him to ponder and appreciate them, such as the sun, the moon, the stars, the seasons, the plants, the animals, the human body, the human soul, the prophets, the scriptures, the miracles, and the testimonies.



  • He warns him of the consequences and accountability that he will face for his deeds and words in this world and in the next, and asks him to repent and reform before it is too late, such as the loss of reputation, the loss of wealth, the loss of health, the loss of life, the wrath of God, the fire of hell, the remorse of the soul, and the justice of God.



  • He invites him to recognize and acknowledge the truth and beauty of his message, and asks him to follow his guidance and example with sincerity and humility, such as the nobility of his station, the purity of his intention, the eloquence of his speech, the wisdom of his teachings, the compassion of his heart, the generosity of his spirit, the patience of his endurance, and the glory of God.



How does Baha'u'llah demonstrate his compassion, forgiveness, and generosity towards the son of the wolf and his enemies?




Baha'u'llah demonstrates his compassion, forgiveness, and generosity towards the son of the wolf and his enemies in several ways. Some of these ways are:



  • He addresses them with respect and courtesy, even though they have treated him with contempt and cruelty. He calls them "O Shaykh", "O people", "O concourse", "O friends", "O ye that have eyes to see", "O ye that have ears to hear", "O ye that are endued with understanding", etc.



  • He expresses his sorrow and grief for their condition and plight, even though they have caused him much pain and suffering. He says "My heart is filled with anguish at your plight", "My soul is sore vexed at your deeds", "My tears flow for your sake", "My sighs are uttered for your redemption", etc.



  • He offers them his pardon and mercy, even though they have wronged him greatly. He says "I beg forgiveness of God for you", "I ask God to forgive you your sins", "I implore God to pardon you your transgressions", "I beseech God to overlook your shortcomings", etc.



that ye may rule over the world as ye please", "I endow you with a measure of My glory that ye may be honored in My presence", "I grant you a share of My knowledge that ye may comprehend My mysteries", "I bestow upon you a portion of My love that ye may be attracted to My beauty", etc.


How does Baha'u'llah express his vision of a peaceful and unified world under God's guidance?




Baha'u'llah expresses his vision of a peaceful and unified world under God's guidance in several ways. Some of these ways are:



  • He proclaims the advent of a new era of human history, marked by the establishment of God's kingdom on earth, the emergence of a new world order, and the fulfillment of God's promises to humanity. He says "The time foreordained unto the peoples and kindreds of the earth is now come", "The Most Great Peace shall come in the world", "The tabernacle of unity hath been raised", "The Day Star of Truth hath shone forth", etc.



  • He reveals the principles and laws that will govern this new era, based on justice, equity, cooperation, and harmony. He says "The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens", "All men have been created to carry forward an ever-advancing civilization", "The well-being of mankind, its peace and security, are unattainable unless and until its unity is firmly established", "The purpose of justice is the appearance of unity among men", etc.



  • He calls upon the rulers and leaders of the world to uphold their responsibilities and duties towards their people and towards God. He says "O kings of the earth! He Who is the sovereign Lord of all is come", "O rulers of the earth! Be reconciled among yourselves", "O kings of the earth! Give ear unto the Voice of God", "O ye the elected representatives of the people in every land! Take ye counsel together", etc.



  • He invites all people to join him in his cause and to work together for the common good and the glory of God. He says "O people! Consort with the followers of all religions in a spirit of friendliness and fellowship", "O people! The Day, promised unto you in all the Scriptures, is now come", "O people! I swear by God! The promised day is come", "O people! Arise to serve Him Who is the Desire of all nations", etc.



Conclusion




In this article, we have provided a brief overview of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, one of the last major works of Baha'u'llah, the founder of the Bahá'í Faith. We have summarized some of the main topics and arguments that Baha'u'llah addresses in this letter, as well as some of the key quotations from various religious scriptures and traditions that he uses to support his claims. We have also explained why this book is a valuable and relevant book for readers today.


Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is a masterpiece of religious literature that showcases Baha'u'llah's eloquence, wisdom, compassion, and vision. It is a book that challenges and inspires readers to reflect on their beliefs and actions, to seek and recognize the truth, and to strive for peace and unity in the world. It is a book that reveals Baha'u'llah's message of hope and love for humanity, and his invitation to join him in his cause.


If you are interested in reading or studying Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, you can access it in different formats, such as IBOOKS, TXT, and PRC. You can also find more information and resources on Baha'u'llah and his teachings on the official website of the Bahá'í Faith, www.bahai.org.


Frequently Asked Questions




Here are some frequently asked questions about Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:


Q: How long is Epistle to the Son of the Wolf?




A: Epistle to the Son of the Wolf


is about 140 pages long in print, and about 50,000 words in length.


Q: What is the main theme of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf?




A: The main theme of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf


is the recognition and acceptance of Baha'u'llah as the manifestation of God for this age, and the implications of this recognition for individual and collective life.


Q: What is the tone and style of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf?




A: The tone and style of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf


are authoritative, persuasive, eloquent, and compassionate. Baha'u'llah uses a variety of rhetorical devices, such as quotations, arguments, proofs, exhortations, admonitions, questions, analogies, metaphors, etc., to convey his message.


Q: Who are the intended audience of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf?




A: The intended audience of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf


are primarily the son of the wolf and his enemies, but also Baha'u'llah's followers and future generations, as well as anyone who is interested in learning about his message.


Q: How can I apply the teachings of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf to my life?




A: You can apply the teachings of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf


to your life by:



  • Seeking and recognizing the truth for yourself, and not relying on blind imitation or prejudice.



Following Baha'u'llah's


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